“One of the most valuable and engaging courses I have attended.”

We love Coaching for safety courses, they hardly seem like work at all. Last week’s for Ervia in Dublin, presented jointly with Thomas Keane of KSi, was especially rewarding. When the room is full of highly-engaged delegates immersed and collaborating to help each other learn new skills, the instructor’s job is a joy. And when delegates describe the experience as “one of the most valuable and engaging courses I have attended,” it really doesn’t get much better. What is it that engages people so? Coaching is all about collaboration – coaches exit to be collaborative and supportive and to help their colleagues and clients perform better. If you attend IOSH Approved Coaching for safety, you will spend two days learning and practicing the skills and techniques that under-pin a collaborative approach. This will enable you, in turn, to help others be better at what they do. You will learn that curiosity drives collaboration and that where you focus your curiosity is a choice. And you will learn what the ‘active’ in active listening really means and why one delegate remarked, “there’s so much being communicated I had no idea. It could be exhausting.”  The way we see it is that technical knowledge is important of course, but alone it’s not enough. We believe that it’s the ability to collaborate that distinguishes the very best practitioners from the rest. And if you can coach, then you’re able to support your colleagues and clients even when you have little or no technical knowledge to contribute. One of the reasons we love it so much is that we know that by helping you...

IOSH Approved Coaching for safety London

Communication is a key component of IOSH Blueprint, the new competency framework for OSH professionals. And with references to questioning, active listening techniques, body language, collaboration and the importance of effective relationships, a casual observer might think that Coaching for safety was written in response to IOSH Blueprint. It wasn’t. IOSH Approved Coaching for safety has been gradually maturing over several years and steadily developing  an excellent reputation as a must-attend, OSH training programme that is like no other. IOSH Approved Coaching for safety was designed to provide OSH practitioners with skills to complement their technical knowledge and help them develop a collaborative style. Collaboration is essential to improving OSH culture, leading to better solutions to safety problems, better management buy-in and better engagement all round. We believe it’s the nearest thing to a silver bullet there is. How are your communication skills? How collaborative are the members of your team? Coaching for safety is unlike any other course – don’t miss out. When                 Wednesday 8th and Thursday 9th February 2017 Where                Holiday Inn Express London – Heathrow T5, London Road, Slough SL3 8QB Price                   £525 + VAT Download a booking form here of call Michael on 01706 217122 or 0792 191...

What is your why?

This is mine; the reason why I do what I do, which has influenced how I do what I do. Shortly after becoming involved in health and safety – and to be honest, before really being sure it was for me – I turned on the television one evening and quite by chance, a Panorama-type documentary was starting. It was about the state of health and safety in the UK and it centred on an accident that happened not far from where I now sit in Lancashire. A worker was dragged into a plastic crumbing machine and killed. The machine, not unlike a large food processor, had an aperture at the top through which waste plastic could be fed, and a giant blade at the bottom rotating at high speed. A factory inspector had been horrified to find that the interlock guard on the lid had been overridden enabling more plastic to be fed into the machine more quickly. The inspector issued a health and safety enforcement notice, prohibiting use of the machine. The bosses ignored the notice and the inevitable happened. George Kenyon was 25 years old when he died and much was made of how little of him there was left for his family to bury. It was exploitation, pure and simple. A staggering lack of consideration for the value of human life. It was 1988 and health and safety was very much in the public consciousness but for altogether different reasons than it is today. In the 1980’s, high-profile accidents involving many fatalities and serious injuries were common – Piper Alpha, The Herald of Free Enterprise,...