Coaching for safety (Approved by IOSH) – Nail the goal

A clearly defined and achievable ‘goal’ is critically important to the ultimate success of the coaching conversation and it is the coach’s responsibility to nail the goal. It seems simple enough but students of coaching often struggle with it and this has consequences for the remainder of the conversation. The role of a coach is to support the coachee in his/her exploration of whatever it is he/she would like to discuss with a view to achieving whatever it is he/she would like to achieve. Coachee’s often come to a coaching conversation with a muddle of thoughts and supporting them to define the objective is a valuable exercise as it helps them to focus and clarify their thinking. But the importance of the goal for the coach also, should not be underestimated. Read more about the importance of nailing the goal here If you’d like to learn more about increasing your effectiveness through coaching skills, including details of our open courses, please call Michael on 01706 217122 or 0792 191 4099...

HSW Coaching Article Part 2 – A problem shared

I’m very grateful to Mark Burton of specialist recruitment organisation Attwood Burton for introducing me to Louis Wustemann, Managing Editor for Health + Safety at Work, the official journal of the International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (IIRSM). It was Mark’s keen interest in, and support for, coaching skills for safety practitioners that paved the way for my articles in the magazine. The first piece entitled Make it Personal appeared in the April edition and made the case that coaching skills are necessary to complement the safety practitioner’s technical knowledge and understanding. Part 2 focuses more closely on the highly-developed listening and questioning skills that are the trademark of great coaching. It’s these complimentary skills that enable practitioners to realise their full potential and avoid the traditional stereotype – the ‘compliance policeman’, technically capable but unable to provide the support managers need.   To read the full article, click here. If you’d like to develop your coaching skills and be the best safety practitioner you can be, please call Michael on 01706 217122 or 0792 191 4099 or email michael@securushealthandsafety.co.uk...

HSW Coaching Article Part 1 – Make it personal

I’m delighted to have been asked by Louis Wustemann, Managing Editor for Health + Safety at Work, the official journal of the International Institute of Risk and Safety Management (IIRSM) to write articles on coaching for the magazine. The first article entitled Make it Personal appeared in the April edition which hit doormats recently. It makes the case that coaching skills are necessary to complement the safety practitioners technical knowledge and understanding. The article also observes that such is the safety profession’s preoccupation with technical qualifications, avoiding the finger-wagging compliance policeman stereotype may be something only the most fortunate and/or enlightened might actually achieve. To read the full article, click here If you’d like to learn more about the importance of coaching skills, including details of our upcoming open course in March, please call Michael on 01706 217122 or 0792 191 4099 or email michael@securushealthandsafety.co.uk...

Coaching for safety (Approved by IOSH) – What do safety people actually do?

One of the reasons many safety practitioners enjoy the role is its scope – one day is simply never the same as another – but what is the function of the safety professional in an organisation and what is it that practitioners actually do? When asked what the role of a safety practitioner is, the sorts of answers practitioners themselves typically provide suggest that a fundamental part of the role is interacting with others in the workplace from senior managers, to line managers and shop-floor workers. It is interesting to reflect then on the technical nature of the safety role as it is often perceived to be. Clearly the safety practitioner is informed by his/her technical knowledge and understanding in all that they do. That said, the success of the interactions practitioners report they have, and ultimately the effectiveness of the practitioner, must depend to some degree on the communication skills of the practitioner and his/her ability to form a productive alliance with others. Read more about the importance of communication skills here If you’d like to learn more about increasing your effectiveness through coaching skills, including details of our upcoming open course in March, please call Michael on 01706 217122 or 0792 191 4099...

Coaching for safety (Approved by IOSH) – Challenging assumptions

In the context of coaching for safety, safety practitioners who are coaches support duty-holders and others in their exploration of safety problems with a view to finding the most reasonably practicable solution. It’s worth reflecting that the most reasonably practicable solution is the one that works best for the duty-holder as only then will the solution be owned and sustained. The challenge for the practitioner is to ensure that the solution that works best for the duty-holder also satisfies legal requirements and standards. Assumptions can be obstacles to clear thinking and exploration. The most tenacious block to new ideas is a limiting assumption according to Nancy Kline.¹ The role of the coach is to support the coachee in identifying the assumption – the coachee may not be fully conscious of it or of its obstructive power – and challenge it. Read more about challenging assumptions here If  you’d like to learn more about increasing your effectiveness through coaching skills, including details of our upcoming open course in March, please call Michael on 01706 217122 or 0792 191 4099...