FREE Coaching for safety podcast

Richard Collins of Safeti Health, Safety & Environment is a man on a mission. His aim, no less, is to “break down the barriers to Health, Safety & Environment learning” and one of his strategies for achieving this is to “provide you with valuable, no-nonsense HSE content to help you learn, share and influence.” Richard is well on his way to developing an impressive community through The Safeti Podcast where he boasts that “We bring together some of the brightest minds in the Health, Safety & Environment space to help you supercharge your knowledge, career or business”. Needless to say then, that I was all the more flattered recently, to be invited by Richard to record a podcast on Coaching for safety for his site. What surprised me about the experience of recording the podcast was this. The 5th anniversary of Coaching for safety achieving IOSH Approval earlier this year, provided an obvious opportunity for reflection; thinking back over the journey and in particular, the difficulties in the early days of practitioners not understanding what coaching is and not valuing soft skills. So I didn’t expect to be doing a great deal of reflecting quite so soon. Driven by Richard’s excellent questioning however, reflect I did. Coaching for safety has undoubtedly changed my professional life profoundly. A traditional, systems-based practitioner for over 20-years, discovering the importance of ‘real’ coaching skills and developing what became IOSH Approved Coaching for safety provided a much-needed ‘shot in the arm’ and shoved my career onto an entirely unexpected path. But Richard’s excellent question about what I thought an insightful question was, crystallised a couple...

Cerealto’s OH&S Policy Boards

Some companies have manuals available in the supervisor’s office or on a shelf in the safety department. Others have their OH&S policy statements on-line, but not everyone has access to a PC. Others still produce leaflets and distribute them to staff. Some of them might get read but virtually all will get binned or lost. It’s not the most exciting reading material after all; people are only interested when they’re interested and more often than not, that’s when there’s an issue. At Cerealto, they’ve developed a format where the details of a specific OH&S policy, are shown on one side of a piece of paper and posted at the entrance to every department, a very public demonstration of the company’s commitment. People are only interested when they’re interested, but when they are they have immediate access to the company policy which states very clearly, who is going to do what to protect people from … you name it … fork lift trucks, hazardous chemicals, lifting equipment, pressure systems etc. etc. Each OH&S Policy is consulted widely before it is accepted as the standard and posted. If issues arise, they’re an excellent source of reference and the perfect focal point for a conversation about what needs to happen. And if you’re thinking about certification to BS EN 45001, this approach is relevant to so many clauses including OH&S Policy (clause 5.2), Organisational Roles and Responsibilities (5.3), Determination of legal requirements and other requirements (6.1.3), Planning action (6.1.4), Communication (7.4), Operational Planning and Control (8.1) and Evaluation of compliance (9.1.2b) and perhaps more besides. We’re not quite finished yet, but we’re getting...

IOSH Approved Coaching for safety – Edinburgh

Our second open IOSH Approved Coaching for safety course north of the border will be at the Holiday Inn Edinburgh on Tuesday 13th and Wednesday 14th November. It seems like a long way off but we’re already taking bookings so if you’re interested in attending … don’t leave it too late. You can download a booking form here. What’s the course about? IOSH Approved Coaching for safety was designed to provide OSH practitioners with the skills that under-pin a collaborative and supportive style. Equipping your team with coaching skills will help them support their colleagues to achieve goals and solve problems but it will also help them to develop their colleagues. At a macro level, that’s how cultures can be changed, gradually gradually, developing the resources you have. Whilst the course was designed for practitioners, to complement the technical knowledge they acquire through NEBOSH or other similar courses, because it’s not a technical course itself, it’s really suitable for anyone and we often have seasoned safety professionals sat next to rookies new to the profession sat next to non-safety people and it works beautifully. Coaching for safety is a highly-participative course structured around a series of live coaching sessions involving real-life subject matter delegates bring themselves – there is absolutely no role play. It’s extremely engaging and we normally manage to have a few laughs too … which can’t be bad. You really should try it...

FREE Coaching for a safer culture e-book

How to improve the culture of an organisation is something that occupies the thoughts of many professionals, including occupational safety and health (OSH) practitioners. But it is also true that the phrase ‘culture change’ is used so often these days that it is fast becoming drab and almost meaningless, a platitude. Try this … the next time you hear someone in the workplace use the phrase ‘culture change’, ask them what they mean by it. Do they hesitate, trip over their words and seem unsure? Many do. If you are looking to achieve a change in culture with a view to healthier and safer outcomes, are the plans that you have going to deliver the culture you want? What are your plans? What is it you want? This publication outlines an approach for navigating your way to a better culture and it shows why it is, that when it comes to culture change, coaching is the nearest thing to a silver bullet there is. Access the publication...

Coaching for safety 5th Anniversary – Turning the corner

I’ve often thought that my career in health and safety chose me. I remember a day in 1988 when my then boss, called me into in his office to say “Cliff’s retiring, I want you to be the new health and safety adviser.” My first thought was “Cliff’s the health and safety adviser!” and my second thought was “What’s health and safety?” It was the first time I remember hearing the phrase. I’d played a part in helping this company achieve the quality standard BS5750 and I thought I was destined for a career in Quality. To say I was reluctant about a detour into this remote backwater called health and safety, is an understatement. So it was with coaching too. I very nearly didn’t attend the course that turned me on to the importance of coaching skills for OSH practitioners. Had I not attended, I’d have continued thinking of myself as a traditional, systems-led health and safety practitioner. But I did attend, and my career took a very unexpected turn. Having achieved IOSH Approval for my Coaching for safety course and received no bookings, not a single one, for the first four open courses advertised, I realised two things: – i. the health and safety profession was fixated with technical knowledge and didn’t value soft skills at all; and ii. practitioners didn’t understand what coaching is. It seems strange now that I didn’t give it all up there and then, but it didn’t cross my mind. Instead, I saw that it was down to me to promote coaching skills and educate practitioners about how important they are. I...